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Crystal Defects and Crystalline Interfaces

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Published by Springer Berlin Heidelberg in Berlin, Heidelberg .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Physics

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby W. Bollmann
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQC1-75
The Physical Object
Format[electronic resource] /
Pagination1 online resource (xi, 254 p.)
Number of Pages254
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL27028237M
ISBN 103642491758, 3642491731
ISBN 109783642491757, 9783642491733
OCLC/WorldCa851823227

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It is nonnal for the preface to explain the motivation behind the writing of the book. Since many good books dealing with the general theory of crystal defects already exist, a new book has to be especially justified, and here its main justification lies in its treatment of crystal­ line interfaces. About , the work of the author, essentially based on the fundamental work of Professor F. C. Frank, started to . Crystal Defects and Crystalline Interfaces. W. Bollmann (auth.) It is nonnal for the preface to explain the motivation behind the writing of the book. Since many good books dealing with the general theory of crystal defects already exist, a new book has to be especially justified, and here its main justification lies in its treatment of crystal­ line interfaces. It is nonnal for the preface to explain the motivation behind the writing of the book. Since many good books dealing with the general theory of crystal defects already exist, a new book has to be especially justified, and here its main justification lies in its treatment of crystal line interfaces. About , the work of the author, essentially based on the fundamental work of Professor F. C. The book is a welcome addition to the literature and highly recommended both as a text and as a work of reference. G. E. BACON Department of Physics The University SheffieM 10 England Crystal defects and crystalline interfaces. By W. BOLL. MANN. Pp. xi + Berlin: Springer Verlag,

The book combines the classical and exact description of symmetry of a perfect crystal with the possible geometries of the major defects-dislocations, stacking faults, point defects, twins, interfaces and the effects of martensitic by:   The book combines the classical and exact description of symmetry of a perfect crystal with the possible geometries of the major defects-dislocations, stacking faults, point defects, twins, interfaces and the effects of martensitic transformations. Crystal Defects and Crystalline Interfaces Hardcover – 1 January by Walter Bollmann (Author)Author: Walter Bollmann. Crystal Defects and Crystalline Interfaces Paperback – 1 Jan. by Walter Bollmann (Author)5/5(1).

Interfaces are two-dimensional imperfections that serve as boundaries between one orderly region of a crystal and another. The interface is commonly a transition region in which the order of the crystal is interrupted. Elements of Structures and Defects of Crystalline Materials has been written to cover not only the fundamental principles. The aim of this new edition of Crystallography and Crystal Defects is to communicate the modern concepts of crystallography in a clear, succinct, manner and to put these concepts into use in the description of line and planar defects in crystalline materials, quasicrystals and crystal interfaces.. Since the first edition of this book, understanding of crystal defects such as dislocations. Adding alloying elements to a metal is one way of introducing a crystal defect. Nevertheless, the term “defect” will be used, just keep in mind that crystalline defects are not always bad. There are basic classes of crystal defects: point defects, which are places where an atom is missing or irregularly placed in the lattice structure. A vacancy A point defect that consists of a single atom missing from a site in a crystal. occurs where an atom is missing from the normal crystalline array; it constitutes a tiny void in the middle of a solid (Figure "Common Defects in Crystals"). We focus primarily on point and plane defects in our discussion because they are encountered.